Program of Study

Thames Academy is a more than just classes and learning.

Every student will experience their learning and class content in a variety of different ways.

Thames Academy is a complete nine-month academic readiness program.

The curriculum aligns with our goal of preparing students for challenging academics and social interactions, and is designed to incrementally challenge students in a variety of college-level learning courses.

Course Sequence

Thames Academy offers a unique 12-6-12-week curriculum. It combines ‘doable’ lengths of expanded classroom time (12 weeks) with smaller condensed sessions (6 weeks) for intensive study and project/experiential learning.


The academic calendar consists of:

HU101
Liberal Studies Course (Writing Intensive)
(3 Credits)

Description: Students will learn the basic foundation for college writing based on topics in liberal arts. Course topic range from Understanding the Graphic Novel, Outliers and The Thinking Brain, The Art of War: Literature and War in the 20th Century, Dr. Seuss: A Critical Reading, History of Rock n’ Roll, The End is Near: Dystopian Literature, - and other topics.

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CO098
Communication and You
(no credit)

CO099 (no credit) This introductory course offers an opportunity to learn and apply, in daily life, practical principles of interpersonal communication. This course is designed to help students improve their communication in both personal and professional contents. Attention is given to the history of communication, human perceptions, interpersonal dynamics, and patterns of inferencing, listening, and verbal and visual symbols. .

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FS099
College Life 101
(no credit)

FC099 (non-credit) College Life 101 is an interactive class which assists in enabling students to have a successful transition to the college setting. This course addresses a wide range of common first year barriers to success and provides students a platform work on and address those barriers.

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Career Exploration

Career Exploration is based on understanding the value of work (part-time, full-time and volunteer) and work ethics, exploring how and why people do their jobs, and the benefit of working in your community, field, or area of interest. Using hands-on-tools, real life scenarios, and visits to professional offices on campus students, students learn about business communications, flexible thinking, how to look for a part-time or full-time job, basic budget information, how to dress, and how to act appropriately in a professional environment. This course is an introduction to the value of purposeful work.

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Liberal Arts Course (Writing Intensive)

Description: Students will learn the basic foundation for college writing based on topics in liberal arts. Course topic range from Understanding the Graphic Novel, Outliers and The Thinking Brain, The Art of War: Literature and War in the 20th Century, Dr. Seuss: A Critical Reading, History of Rock n’ Roll, The End is Near: Dystopian Literature, - and other topics.

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Technology and Society

This course explores the innovation of technology and examines its impact on everyday life. Specifically focusing on the six agents of socialization, this course will discuss theories of identity development, the importance of community, social interaction, various ethical and moral issues surrounding the use of technology, online learning and the use of mass media to create social change. The course will also include a technology component that will familiarize students with various software and word processing programs such as Microsoft Word and PowerPoint. Students will learn the basic functions within these programs on both Mac and PC computer. This course includes study and learning strategies built into the curriculum.

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Introduction to Effective Presentations

This course is designed to increase the student’s effectiveness as a communicator and presenter by emphasizing critical thinking, careful research, organization, and delivery strategies.

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Career Exploration

Career Exploration is based on understanding the value of work (part-time, full-time and volunteer) and work ethics, exploring how and why people do their jobs, and the benefit of working in your community, field, or area of interest. Using hands-on-tools, real life scenarios, and visits to professional offices on campus students, students learn about business communications, flexible thinking, how to look for a part-time or full-time job, basic budget information, how to dress, and how to act appropriately in a professional environment. This course is an introduction to the value of purposeful work.

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College Math (students will place in one of these courses).

MA102 - MA102 includes a review of arithmetic and geometric concepts: operations on signed numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, exponents, perimeter, area, volume, surface area, use of formulas, variable expressions, linear equations in one variable, graphs of lines, word problems and time permitting, linear systems of two equal equations and two unknowns. This course is intended for students who have little or no background in algebra.
MA104 - MA104 is designed for students who will not pursue science or business careers. It covers logic, set theory, sets of numbers, summations, summation notation, functional notation, permutations, combinations, and, time allowing, other topics such as the mathematics of finance and mathematics and art.

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MA102
Fundamentals of Algebra
(3 Credits)

MA102 includes a review of arithmetic and geometric concepts: operations on signed numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, exponents, perimeter, area, volume, surface area, use of formulas, variable expressions, linear equations in one variable, graphs of lines, word problems and time permitting, linear systems of two equal equations and two unknowns. This course is intended for students who have little or no background in algebra.

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MA103
Intermediate College Algebra
(3 credits)

Intermediate Algebra is designed for the student who may need review or reinforcement in algebra concepts and problem solving. The course will cover solving and graphing linear equations, using and applying formulas, polynomials, exponents, radicals, factoring and quadratic equations.

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MA104
Mathematics for Liberal Arts
(3 credits)

MA104 is designed for students who will not pursue science or business careers. It covers logic, set theory, sets of numbers, summations, summation notation, functional notation, permutations, combinations, and, time allowing, other topics such as the mathematics of finance and mathematics and art.

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MA105
College Algebra
(3 credits)

College Algebra covers the theory of functions, inverse functions, exponential functions, logarithms, and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, systems of equations, and inequalities, quadratic equations, series, the binomial theorem, matrices and applications.

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MA104
Mathematics for Liberal Arts
(3 Credits)

MA104 is designed for students who will not pursue science or business careers. It covers logic, set theory, sets of numbers, summations, summation notation, functional notation, permutations, combinations, and, time allowing, other topics such as the mathematics of finance, mathematics and art.

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SO103
Introduction to Sociology
(3 Credits)

Emphasizing the study of United States society within the context of the global spectrum, this course deals with social institutions such as marriage, gender roles, media, culture, social groups and interaction, variations in family life, deviance, social stratification, and race/ethnicity. This course includes study and learning strategies built into the curriculum.

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HU102
Profiles In Human Excellence
(3 Credits)

This course creates an interdisciplinary study that explores the realm of human excellence. This course looks at opportunities and experiences that have enabled a variety of people in a variety of fields to achieve excellence. It also looks at what truly motivates humans to work hard and succeed. This is a writing intensive (WI) course, requiring students to submit a minimum of 15 pages of revised and edited text in finished form. Writing strategies are built into the curriculum.

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CO099
Personal and Professional Communication
(no credit)

This introductory course offers an opportunity to learn and apply, in daily life, practical principles of interpersonal communication. This course is designed to help students improve their communication in both personal and professional contexts. Attention is given to the history of communication, human perceptions, interpersonal dynamics, patterns of inference, listening, and verbal and visual symbols.

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Seeing My Time (Executive Functioning Course)

Seeing My Time is a unique and progressive course with exercises, discussions, and in-class projects. These engaging sessions intentionally pushes students to understanding different learning styles, alternative ways to work on projects, and how to have mental flexibility. Students are asked to engage in work during class with drawings, verbal and written response, and projects that meet their learning styles. Students are relieved to learn new ways to handle the stress of academic pressure, finding new organization tools, and seeing success in their for-credit courses as a result of this element of the program.

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Mitchell Course

Students with a 3.0 or better at the conclusion of the fall semester will be eligible to take a course on upper campus.

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CE099
Career Exploration
(no credit)

Career Exploration is based on understanding the value of work (part-time, full-time and volunteer) and work ethics, exploring how and why people do their jobs, and the benefit of working in your community, field, or area of interest. Using hands-on-tools, real life scenarios, and visits to professional offices on campus students, students learn about business communications, flexible thinking, how to look for a part-time or full-time job, basic budget information, how to dress, and how to act appropriately in a professional environment. This course is an introduction to the value of purposeful work.

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